Balabit named Representative Vendor in Gartner Mar... » NEW YORK CITY:  Balabit has been listed as a representative vendor in Gartner’s Market Guide for Use... Aricent and Rohde, Schwarz Cybersecurity unveil a ... » REDWOOD CITY, California/ Leipzig, Germany: Aricent, Rohde & Schwarz Cybersecurity have announce... TrapX deepens deception capabilities with Deceptio... » SAN MATEO, Calif.: TrapX Security has released version 6.0 of its DeceptionGrid™ platform. Version 6... Cloud infrastructure services providers comply wit... » Brussels: The Cloud Infrastructure Services Providers in Europe (CISPE)have declared that over 30 se... Armour Comms launches first secure Voice over IP... » London: Armour Communications has announced its integration with Skype for Business. Armour Mobile i... Anam Technologies selected by Deutsche Telekom a... » DUBLIN, BONN:  Anam Technologies has gone into partnership with Deutsche Telekom International Carri... 6.7 percent of programmes on private UK PCs are en... » Maidenhead, U.K: The average private user in the UK has 72 programmes installed on their PC, and 6.7... Multitone’s EkoSecure Personal Alert System chos... » Multitone Electronics plc has announced that its German-based team, Multiton Elektronik GmbH, has su... IoT 2020: Smart and secure IoT platform » Geneva, Switzerland: The Internet of Things (IoT) significantly impacts the global economy and is ex... Letterbox company to keep properties safe with inn... » A specialist mailbox manufacturer has made a pledge to enhance the security of UK properties through...

CLICK HERE TO

Advertise with Vigilance

Got News?

Got news for Vigilance?

Have you got news/articles for us? We welcome news stories and articles from security experts, intelligence analysts, industry players, security correspondents in the main stream media and our numerous readers across the globe.

READ MORE

Subscribe to Vigilance Weekly

Information Security Header

London: The existence of Heartbleed, a vulnerability in the OpenSSL open source software, was recently announced. The OpenSSL encryption tool is used worldwide on countless websites, which means the loophole can be used by hackers to access data stored on computers, such as passwords, certificates, etc., even if the websites utilise encryption with the https protocol. But unauthorised access via stolen user identities is prevented by the tokenless two-factor authentication procedure from the developer SecurEnvoy. None of the solutions from this manufacturer have such security vulnerabilities, as they do not make use of OpenSSL. In other words, users of the tokenless two-factor authentication method are not compromised. Quite the contrary in fact - "the SecurEnvoy solutions can also provide protection when used together with products from other manufacturers that are affected by Heartbleed," comments Andy Kemshall, Technical Director at SecurEnvoy. "This is because, at best, cyber criminals would only be able to capture single use passcodes from computer memories. But these are valid only once and would have already expired, i.e. ceased to be functional."

Using SecurEnvoy solutions, users can unambiguously identify themselves without the need for additional, dedicated tokens; this is because mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets are used as authentication tools. The passcodes required for authentication purposes are sent via SMS, e-mail, landline call, QR code scanning or a soft token app. Because of this tokenless approach, the solutions can be installed very quickly.

Two-level seed records maximize security

SecurEnvoy ensures this high level of security by dividing the seed record, which is a special algorithm used to create the one-time passcode. The user needs such a numerical code in order to login using tokenless two-factor authentication – the passcode is combined with personal login details in order to grant access, with only the correct combination allowing the login to succeed. At no time is SecurEnvoy itself in possession of information about the seed records and passcodes that are generated. Instead, part of the record is generated locally on the client's server, while the second part is defined using characteristic properties of the mobile appliance used. This effectively forms a "fingerprint" consisting of information about the SIM card, the CPU or equivalent. Each time the user requests a passcode, the user’s appliance decrypts the first part of the seed record and defines the second par