International SOS and Vismo in joint partnership t... » York, UK: International SOS, the world's leading medical and security services company, and Vismo, a... Tech Mahindra selects Qualys to expand global IT s... » REDWOOD CITY, Calif.: Qualys, Inc. has announced a strategic partnership with Tech Mahindra , a mult... Barracuda launches SignNow Appliance » Barracuda Networks has launched the Barracuda SignNow version 4.0 and the new Barracuda SignNow Appl... Boston Networks design, deliver and maintain Intel... » Regarded as the world’s most prestigious team golf event, Boston Networks delivers a full turnkey so... British Parliament tells Teeside University to sta... » Ground-breaking research at Teesside University which has been described as the “holy grail” of crim... Army Officer wins engineering Modern Day Visionary... » Source: MoD AIRCRAFT Engineering Officer Major Oli Morgan has been named as the 2014 Modern Day V... Electronic I.D. Card project in Nigeria: How not t... » President Goodluck Jonathan recently launched a MasterCard-branded Nigerian National Electronic I.D ... Do you know which smartphone is the most popular s... » Surprisingly, it’s not the iPhone, LG, Huawei or HTC and Windows Phone hardly gets a look in. Even t... Auditors stresses importance of CHD Discovery » PCIQ2PCIQ3 Despite the fact that over 76% of QSAs and ISAs consider card holder data (CHD) discover... BSIA makes case for private security industry » With Conference season upon us, the British Security Industry Association (BSIA), has been busy cham...

CLICK HERE TO

Advertise with Vigilance

Got News?

Got news for Vigilance?

Have you got news/articles for us? We welcome news stories and articles from security experts, intelligence analysts, industry players, security correspondents in the main stream media and our numerous readers across the globe.

READ MORE

Subscribe to Vigilance Weekly

Information Security Header

London: Commenting on the system compromise of US-based security vendor Bit9, Venafi says that the cybercriminal incursion – whilst unfortunate – signals the significant changes in the threat landscape that have been taking place over the last few years.

 

According to Calum Macleod, EMEA Director with the Enterprise Key and Certificate Management (EKCM) solutions specialist, just as the hacktivist force behind the Anonymous collective has gathered pace in recent times – culminating last April with Time classifying the cause in its top 100 of the world’s most influential people (http://ti.me/WGnERB) - so the cybercriminal landscape has also changed.

“It’s a much darker threats landscape that IT security professionals are now dealing with, with trust – amongst clients, peer organisations and employees – having become an incredibly fragile, but essential, part of the security fabric of business,” he said.

“This situation is compounded by the fact that executives - even those in IT security arena - have little to no understanding of how truly fragile trust is today. A few kilobytes of cryptographic data can mean the difference between a company losing millions from the serious financial and reputational consequences that result,” he added.

The Venafi EMEA Director went on to say that, every business and government now relies on cryptographic keys and certificates to provide and ensure these levels of trust.

These technologies, he explained, are behind what makes society function today —from card payments, online shopping, all the way to smartphones and cloud computing.

And in parallel with this, he says, the ability to measure and track trust has also changed in what is an increasingly global and interconnected world.

Unfortunately, adds Macleod, cybercriminals now understand how fragile our ability to control trust has become.

“Malware like Flame and Stuxnet - and targeted attacks such as those on Bit9 - are just some of the examples of the escalating and accelerating attacks on trust in a business landscape that relies on technology,” he said.

“The only certainty that can be drawn from this event is that these types of attacks – and their underlying methodologies - will explode as more cybercriminals become aware of their success,” he added.

 

“The inability to detect these attacks, take action - and ultimately the pervasiveness of cryptographic keys and certificates, plus the protocols that depend on them – means that criminals of all types will increasingly continue to turn their attention to these attacks.