The Devil is in the Data - Infographic » Irish image and data auditing company PixAlert have released an infographic highlighting the signifi... Wargaming Brings its Naval MMO to gamescom 2014 » Wargaming has announced its presence at gamescom 2014, the world's largest trade fair for interactiv... Barracuda Backup achieves VMware Ready status » Basingstoke: Barracuda Networks, Inc. has announced that Barracuda Backup has achieved VMware Ready™... Valuing the Police Report » Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) has rated the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) as... Fonix Mobile selects Alert Logic to extend its s... » London: London-based SMS messaging and mobile payment billing company Fonix Mobile has chosen Alert ... Attenda positioned for Cloud-enabled managed hosti... » London: Attenda Limited today has been positioned by Gartner Inc., in the Challengers quadrant of th... Downing of Malaysian jet: UN calls on parties t... » [The UN Security Council holds a moment of silence in honour of the victims of crashed flight MH17. ... How foreign security firms are treating Nigerians ... » ...With introduction by JOHN ODEY ADUMA, EDITOR AND BRITISH CHEVENING SCHOLAR The Presi... Bill Butler happy with key survey findings » Boss of the SIA Executive Bill Butler welcomes the key findings of the recently published IFSEC Glob... Mighty Mitie is over £3.75 million richer as it... » Mitie was recently awarded three contracts in its award-winning painting business. Combined, the thr...

CLICK HERE TO

Advertise with Vigilance

Got News?

Got news for Vigilance?

Have you got news/articles for us? We welcome news stories and articles from security experts, intelligence analysts, industry players, security correspondents in the main stream media and our numerous readers across the globe.

READ MORE

Subscribe to Vigilance Weekly

Information Security Header

A new attack makes some password cracking faster, easier than ever. A researcher has devised a method that reduces the time and resources required to crack passwords that are protected by the SHA1 cryptographic algorithm.

Tal Be'ery, Web Researcher at Imperva has looked into the SHA1 methodology and why companies should stay clear of using this method to protect passwords:

 

"First, some context. One of the main use cases for hashing function, such as the SHA-1 function, is to store passwords securely. When attackers obtain such hashed password, they need to launch a “brute force” attack against it, in order to reveal the password. “Brute force” means, they need to repeatedly guess the password, apply the hashing function on it and compare the result with their hash password they have. The security researcher has found an algorithmic shortcut in SHA-1 calculation that makes the computation easier, thus reducing the time needed to successfully “brute force” an attack.

The corollary? In case the hashing is done for security (e.g. hash user passwords, verify data integrity, etc.):

MD5 is dead and should never be used.

SHA-1 is going in the same direction. Consider an upgrade of existing systems and definitely don't use it for new systems.

A smart choice would be to follow the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recommendation for federal agencies: "Federal agencies should stop using SHA-1 for generating digital signatures, generating time stamps and for other applications that require collision resistance."

Best option? Use a hash function from SHA-2 family, such as the SHA256."